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What type of rope should I use?

Also, one last note – in addition to your rope kit, I highly recommend a fun new toy I got in 2019, which combines very well with bondage. It’s amazing, and you and your partners will thank me. Pros:. This is a twisted rope; it gives you different kind of rope marks than braids do, and has a different sort of aesthetic to it. Wasn’t terribly expensive; maybe 15 dollars for a bundle? I wouldn’t use this stuff for bondage at all with the core intact. If you buy from them through a link on my site, they give me a small percentage. Buy Rope! Perhaps after doing this yourself once or twice, you will understand why bondage rope vendors charge what they do for bondage-ready rope!

It is considerably stronger than the Zen rope I just mentioned; and again, is rated. Apparently it is often used as boat rope, so I’d say it’s fairly hardwearing and durable. If you've benefited from or enjoyed what you've read, then please check out Rope Bondage The Smart Way, which answers every conceivable question for the beginner, shares my favorite ties and how to use them to best advantage. There are also tips on making uber sexy fun times happen, and real life examples and case studies of rope bondage fuelled awesomeness. Has a really, really nice smell – sort of earthy and warm. Knots are not at all difficult to unpick; because of the compactness of that tight lay, it doesn’t tend to squish and become difficult.

Price: Good jute tends to be fairly pricey. I got my first set of five millimeter jute from Jade Rope (fairly large set, about 80 metres) for about $113.00 Australian dollars before shipping. In general, most synthetic ropes are like that, to one level or another. This is actually a hollow braid kind of rope; meaning it’s a polypropylene braid wrapped around a core of something. Likely to get quite compact knots with it. Very washable. Jute makes for extremely good photos in it’s un-dyed state. It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it.

It’s very smooth, with almost no tooth, which means a lot less friction, making it a slicker, faster rope. In general, most synthetic ropes are like that, to one level or another. It’s not dyeable; you’re stuck with the colour you buy. The combination of the lack of weight and the lack of friction means it’s going to slide a bit over skin. It is considerably stronger than the Zen rope I just mentioned; and again, is rated. Apparently it is often used as boat rope, so I’d say it’s fairly hardwearing and durable.

If you love to color rope (think your partner would look hot in deep purple or something), nylon is also a good choice (pure nylon, not poly-blends with nylon, not poly-pro, poly doesn’t accept dye). Nylon is nicely smooth and comfortable as well, but it has very low tooth, so you need to use surgeon’s knots instead of square knots and any half-hitch style knot should be done three times instead of two. It really depends on you and who you’re tying. Different ropes have different advantages, different pros and cons. It wouldn’t ordinarily have gotten my attention, because it looks fairly obviously too stiff for use as bondage rope. However, as I examined it, I realized that I could probably remove the core. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. 5 millimetre tossa jute. I had my Zen rope for quick synthetic ties, and I later moved on to focus on natural fibres. However, I snapped a couple of pictures of it while I was at Bunnings.

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